Saturday, 29 September 2012

Bear in mind this is from the Guardian, so ignore the slant.
Greece's far-right Golden Dawn party is increasingly assuming the role of law enforcement officers on the streets of the bankrupt country, with mounting evidence that Athenians are being openly directed by police to seek help from the neo-Nazi group, analysts, activists and lawyers say.

In return, a growing number of Greek crime victims have come to see the party, whose symbol bears an uncanny resemblance to the swastika, as a "protector".

One victim of crime, an eloquent US-trained civil servant, told the Guardian of her family's shock at being referred to the party when her mother recently called the police following an incident involving Albanian immigrants in their downtown apartment block.

"They immediately said if it's an issue with immigrants go to Golden Dawn," said the 38-year-old, who fearing for her job and safety, spoke only on condition of anonymity. "We don't condone Golden Dawn but there is an acute social problem that has come with the breakdown of feeling of security among lower and middle class people in the urban centre," she told the Guardian. "If the police and official mechanism can't deliver and there is no recourse to justice, then you have to turn to other maverick solutions."

Other Greeks with similar experiences said the far-rightists, catapulted into parliament on a ticket of tackling "immigrant scum" were simply doing the job of a defunct state that had left a growing number feeling overwhelmed by a "sense of powerlessness". "Nature hates vacuums and Golden Dawn is just filling a vacuum that no other party is addressing," one woman lamented. "It gives 'little people' a sense that they can survive, that they are safe in their own homes."

Far from being tamed, parliamentary legitimacy appears only to have emboldened the extremists. In recent weeks racially-motivated attacks have proliferated. Immigrants have spoken of their fear of roaming the streets at night following a spate of attacks by black-clad men on motorbikes. Street vendors from Africa and Asia have also been targeted.

"For a lot of people in poorer neighbourhoods we are liberators," crowed Yiannis Lagos, one of 18 MPs from the stridently patriot "popular nationalist movement" to enter the 300-seat house in June. "The state does nothing," he told a TV chat show, adding that Golden Dawn was the only party that was helping Greeks, hit by record levels of poverty and unemployment, on the ground. Through an expansive social outreach programme, which also includes providing services to the elderly in crime-ridden areas, the group regularly distributes food and clothes parcels to the needy.

But the hand-outs come at a price: allegiance to Golden Dawn. "A friend who was being seriously harassed by her husband and was referred to the party by the police very soon found herself giving it clothes and food in return," said a Greek teacher, who, citing the worsening environment enveloping the country, again spoke only on condition of anonymity. "She's a liberal and certainly no racist and is disgusted by what she has had to do."

The strategy, however, appears to be paying off. On the back of widespread anger over biting austerity measures that have also hit the poorest hardest, the popularity of the far-rightists has grown dramatically with polls indicating a surge in support for the party.

One survey last week showed a near doubling in the number of people voicing "positive opinions" about Golden Dawn, up from 12% in May to 22%. The popularity of Nikos Michaloliakos, the party's rabble-rousing leader had shot up by 8 points, much more than any other party leader.

Paschos Mandravelis, a prominent political analyst, attributed the rise in part to the symbiotic relationship between the police and Golden Dawn. "Greeks haven't turned extremist overnight. A lot of the party's backing comes from the police, young recruits who are a-political and know nothing about the Nazis or Hitler," he said. "For them, Golden Dawn supporters are their only allies on the frontline when there are clashes between riot police and leftists."

Riding the wave, the party has taken steps to set up branches among diaspora Greek communities abroad, opening an office in New York last week. Others are expected to open in Australia and Canada. Cadres say they are seeing particular momentum in support from women.

With Greeks becoming ever more radicalised, the conservative-led government has also clamped down on illegal immigration, detaining thousands in camps and increasing patrols along the country's land and sea frontier with Turkey.

But in an environment of ever increasing hate speech and mounting tensions, the party's heavy-handedness is also causing divisions. A threat by Golden Dawn to conduct raids against vendors attending an annual fair in the town of Arta this weekend has caused uproar.

"They say they have received complaints about immigrant vendors from shop owners here but that is simply untrue," said socialist mayor Yiannis Papalexis. "Extra police have been sent down from Athens and if they come they will be met by leftists who have said they will beat them up with clubs. I worry for the stability of my country."

Seated in her office beneath the Acropolis, Anna Diamantopoulou, a former EU commissioner, shakes her head in disbelief. Despair, she says, has brought Greece to a dangerous place.

"I never imagined that something like Golden Dawn would happen here, that Greeks could vote for such people," she sighed. "This policy they have of giving food only to the Greeks and blood only to the Greeks. The whole package is terrifying. This is a party based on hate of 'the other'. Now 'the other' is immigrants, but who will 'the other' be tomorrow?"
Source: Guardian

10 comments:

Maria José said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=yrRRZpHZswQ

Anonymous said...

I have been following the comment thread for this article on the Guardian website. There is a commenter that goes by the moniker Sam Alexander, he is wiping the floor with the Guardinistas. His first comment was at almost 900 recommends last I checked and they are livid.

Anonymous said...

Throughout human history, the first reason that people have created governments is for protection. Everything else is secondary. Europe's leaders withdrew from this task 30 years ago, so it's hardly surprising that groups which have stepped in to fill this gap have been gaining in popularity.

It's bizarre to see people throwing words like "radical" and "extremism" and "hate" around to slander a group for the offense of sticking up for its countrymen, when they are simply filling the most ordinary and basic role that governments have always fulfilled in lieu of a national government that refuses its responsibility.

This is how sick and corrupted our ruling elites have become: allowing the people to be robbed, raped and murdered by foreigners is a noble gesture of inclusion and multicultural outreach, while preserving their rights is "reactionary" and "fascist."

Anonymous said...

It's kind of hard to like The Other when it has been victimizing you for years. People are sick and tired of their governments giving priority to foreign parasites and robbers over the citizens.

Anonymous said...

Ironic that the article speculates about who will be the coming other, when the politicians, opinion-makers, and policies that outfits like The Guardian support succeeded decades ago in turning specifically those who are the greatest asset to our nations - hardworking, law-abiding responsible native citizens - into The Other. They tell us that those worthy of admiration now are drug-abusing entertainers, hostile foreign lunatics, flamboyant sexual degenerates, and other parasites and aberrations who contribute little or nothing essential to the national fabric.

There will always be Others. In traditional societies, these have generally been those whose values were found to be the most alien to those of the native culture. Now we have inverted the paradigm: those whose values are the most opposed to those of the native traditional society are honored and admired, while those who had traditionally always been considered the most representative and worthwhile members of society are scorned and discriminated against.

It's a sick world we live in.

Anonymous said...

Throughout human history, the first reason that people have created governments is for protection. Everything else is secondary. Europe's leaders withdrew from this task 30 years ago, so it's hardly surprising that groups which have stepped in to fill this gap have been gaining in popularity.

It's bizarre to see people throwing words like "radical" and "extremism" and "hate" around to slander a group for the offense of sticking up for its countrymen, when they are simply filling the most ordinary and basic role that governments have always fulfilled in lieu of a national government that refuses its responsibility.

This is how sick and corrupted our ruling elites have become: allowing the people to be robbed, raped and murdered by foreigners is a noble gesture of inclusion and multicultural outreach, while preserving their rights is "reactionary" and "fascist."

Anonymous said...

Anna diamantopoulou is a member of pasok (the socialists who fell from 45% to 5%) and a former minister. Her political carreer is over. She has failed to get elected into parliament. people hate her. Unfortunately she continues to give stupid interviews to the corrupted media because she has many connections to journalists.

peter theodosiou said...

get rid of this natzi symbol
natzi is german zionist jew
this is not greek symbol
replace with god apollo

peter theodosiou said...

greeks want nothing to do with zionist jews and natzis

greeks are not natzis

peter theodosiou said...

greeks like germans
they dont like german zionists
they dont like german natzis
greeks are not jews

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